A beginner’s guide to NGSengine

Step-by-step explanation by Remco Malestein B.ASc how to start using NGSengine

Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).


Remco Malestein B.ASc Technical Application Specialist

PIRCHE Epitope Matching in Kidney Transplantation: A Case Study

Have you heard about PIRCHE?
PIRCHE® is a new technology for estimating the risk of immune responses after transplantation. It is the first HLA matching algorithm taking into account the indirect pathway of allo-recognition. PIRCHE currently has more than 650 users in 57 countries.

With NGSengine version 2.16 or higher, you can have access to the PIRCHE export feature. In this webinar, Dr Eric Spierings, UMC, and Matthias Niemann, PIRCHE, will take you through the PIRCHE web platform and its epitope matching modules.

Dr Eric Spierings, Associate Professor, Director of the HLA tyssue typing lab UMC

Matthias Niemann, Director of Technology PIRCHE

 

Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

Challenging NGSengine case studies

In this webinar we will deal with challenging case studies for in-depth data analysis and interactive discussions.

You will receive data files in advance. We ask you to analyze the data and think about what you would report to the clinician. Before the webinar we would like to receive your feedback on education@gendx.com so we can address them in the live webinar (trial license available on request). We look forward to receiving your interpretation of the data.

Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

New findings on the HLA-related MR1 gene

Registration will open soon

MR1 is an MHC class I-related protein that is largely considered to be monomorphic, with just a few SNPs being described in literature. GenDx is developing a new assay for amplification of MR1 and during development we have already discovered six new alleles, questioning its monomorphic nature.
In this webinar, Dr. John Trowsdale PhD and Sake van Wageningen PhD will discuss the functions of the MR1 protein, the new findings on the polymorphicity, and the potential clinical relevance.

     

Significance and detection of chimerism after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

The outcome of the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) depends heavily on timely and precise interventions in the early post-transplantation period, such as donor lymphocyte infusions and changes in the immunosuppresion administration. A decision about the necessity of these interventions can be made only if a very close monitoring of the engraftment is performed. Chimerism analysis is a powerful tool for achieving this purpose and has become a routine procedure for HSCT patient follow-up, in some cases becoming even a substitute for the minimal residual disease detection. The talk will give basic concepts about the chimerism analysis procedure, discuss the relevance of the test results in the malignant and non-malignant disease scenarios and briefly review the current methodologies used in this field.

By attending our webinars you can receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

NGSengine case studies

In this webinar, we will deal with challenging case studies for in-depth data analysis and interactive discussions.

You will receive data files in advance. We ask you to analyze the data and think about what you would report to the clinician. Before the webinar, we would like to receive your answers and questions on education@gendx.com so we can address them in the live webinar (trial license available on request).
We look forward to receiving your interpretation of the data!

Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

   

Transitioning to NGS: Why, and what to consider?

As HLA typing lab, you might consider moving to NGS as a method for HLA typing. What are the advantages and what are the factors to consider when making such a move. We will discuss instrumentation, ancillary equipment and other less obvious factors to make an informed decision.

Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

New Insights from High-Resolution KIR Sequencing in Neurological Disease

We are thrilled that Dr. Jill A. Hollenbach, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor Neurology at the UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences has accepted our invitation to share new insights on High-resolution KIR sequencing in neurological diseases. A major focus of her laboratory’s work is building software tools designed to overcome the challenges associated with complex genomic regions like KIR in order to take advantage of the low cost, high-throughput and high fidelity of short read next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods and to effectively mine existing whole genome sequencing data. By applying these methods in diverse cohorts of patients with neurological disease, they are gaining new insights into the immunological underpinning and pathogenesis of diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease.

Natural killer (NK) cell mediated immunity is a key component of the first line of defense against viruses and tumors. The killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are a family of receptors expressed on NK cells and a small percentage of T-cells where they interact with tissue/cell human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules to regulate cell killing and cytokine responses. A balance between inhibitory and activating KIR helps ensure that NK cells develop to be tolerant of healthy autologous cells and responsive to cells with compromised HLA expression (e.g., in some virus-infected and tumor cells). Located on human chromosome 19q13.4, the KIR gene complex displays considerable heterogeneity in gene content; KIR haplotypes contain from 4-14 genes and have considerable variation between individuals and populations. Superimposed upon this gene-content variation is a remarkably high level of allelic polymorphism, with an unusually high density of polymorphic sites. Importantly, this genetic diversity directly affects the functional properties of NK cells. Variation in KIR genes is known to affect expression levels and signaling properties of the KIR molecules, as well as the strength and specificity of interaction with HLA. The combination of high levels of both gene-content and allelic variation coupled with extensive homology between all loci has until recently been a barrier to detailed interrogation of the region.

By attending our webinars you can receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

NGSengine case studies

You will receive data files in advance. We ask you to analyze the data and think about what you would report to the clinician. Before the webinar we would like to receive your answers and questions on education@gendx.com so we can address them in the live webinar. (trial license available on request) We look forward to receiving your interpretation of the data!

Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

NGSengine case studies

In the last webinar of the May series we will deal with challenging case studies for in-depth data analysis and interactive discussions.
This webinar, Hanneke Merkens PhD (Associate Director Support & Education, GenDx) and Erik Rozemuller PhD (Senior Scientist Bioinformatics, GenDx) will use samples of two loyal webinar listeners.

You will receive data files in advance. We ask you to analyze the data and think about what you would report to the clinician. Before the webinar we would like to receive your answers and questions on education@gendx.com so we can address them in the live webinar. (trial license available on request) We look forward to receiving your interpretation of the data!

Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs). Fill out the survey after the webinar to apply.

                 

Daily practice in an HLA lab: dealing with HLA-DR, a complicated genetic region

The DR locus of the class II HLA region is unique. Compared to the other classical class II HLA molecules, HLA-DQ and HLA-DP, each of which has a single, polymorphic locus encoding for the alpha and beta chains, the HLA-DR molecule is comprised of an essentially monomorphic alpha chain, and multiple, polymorphic loci that encode for the beta chain. Additionally, there is variability in the number of loci encoding for the beta chains, with either one or two HLA-DRB loci per chromosome. This genetic complexity can lead to challenges in typing HLA-DR for clinical purposes.

In this webinar Dr. Nicholas Brown will discuss the genetic structure of HLA-DR, and discuss how the complexity can be managed.

Variability in HLA expression: Impact on histocompatibility assay interpretation and immunologic risk assessment

Assessment of immunologic risk in solid organ transplantation is one of the primary functions of an HLA laboratory. The risk assessment is based on the cumulative interpretation of multiple assays used to measure HLA antibodies and the believed understanding of HLA in the allograft. What is not well recognized is the degree of variability in HLA molecules immobilized onto Luminex single antigen beads, variable HLA expression on T and B lymphocytes used in cell-based crossmatches, and biologically encoded differences affecting in vivo HLA expression. Variable HLA expression is therefore inherent across all assays used in HLA laboratories as well as donor HLA targeted by recipient HLA antibodies.

In this webinar, Dr. Hidalgo will provide a brief overview of these concepts and how they impact the interpretation of immunologic risk in transplant recipients. Live chat will be open for your questions or comments

Webinar 4 out of 4: GenDx case studies (advanced level)

In the third webinar of the series we will deal with challenging case studies for in-depth data analysis and interactive discussions.

-Live discussion of NGS data
-Tips and tricks

NEW! Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

Webinar 3 out of 4: GenDx case studies (easy/medium level)

In the third webinar of the series we will deal with challenging case studies for in-depth data analysis and interactive discussions.

-Live discussion of NGS data
-Tips and tricks

NEW! Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

Webinar 2 out of 4: Introduction to NGSengine®

In the second webinar of the series, discover the basic principals of the NGS workflow and see how data analysis in NGSengine® works.

-NGSengine® software demo
-Tips and tricks for effective data analysis
-Demonstration of a GenDx case study

NEW! Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

Webinar 1 out of 4: Basics of NGS workflow

In the first webinar of the series, discover the basic principals of the NGS workflow and see how data analysis in NGSengine® works.

-Introduction about high-resolution HLA typing with NGS
-NGS workflows for HLA typing

NEW! Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

Multiplex amplification for fast and easy HLA typing

At GenDx we strive for fast and easy sequencing-based HLA typing. Using a multiplexed PCR strategy significantly reduces pipetting steps and hands-on time. In this webinar, Sake van Wageningen PhD, Project Manager R&D, will present the GenDx multiplexed strategies and give a development update on our latest 11-loci multiplex product. He will also demonstrate how multiplexed data is analyzed in NGSengine.

NEW! Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

How to deal with an incomplete allele

Incomplete HLA genes in the IMGT database can form a challenge in data analysis. In this webinar, Maarten Penning, Chief Technology Officer, will explain how the NGSengine software handles incomplete alleles. Using case studies directly from the field, he will show examples of the benefits and challenges of extrapolated data, and how to interpret your results when no extrapolated data is available.

Topics to be discussed:
• Extrapolated data explained
• NGSengine case studies from the field

Live chat will be open for your questions or comments

NEW! Attend the webinar and receive 0.15 continuing education credits (CECs).

Register to webinar 12.00-12.30 pm CET (Amsterdam, NL) via this link
Register to webinar 12.00-12.30 pm CST (Chicago, IL, USA) via this link